Home Blog Page 5

Coronavirus: 900 airport jobs disappear – as testing task force receives lukewarm response | Economic news

0

Britain’s largest airport group has announced plans to cut 900 jobs – as ministers launch a COVID-19 testing task force to try to revive travel.

Manchester Airports Group (MAG) – which has hubs in Manchester, Stansted and East Midlands – said a continued drop in demand at the end of the leave program and a lack of progress in testing had prompted it to act .

MAG said it was proposing to cut 465 jobs in Manchester, 376 in Stansted and 51 in East Midlands. Other job changes will also be made, in particular to change models.

The announcement came as the Department of Transportation said a new task force would work with industry to try to reduce 14-day quarantine times for travelers through the use of testing.

But there was no timeline for the introduction of a testing diet, prompting a lukewarm response from Virgin Atlantic – another matter hard hit speak pandemic – who welcomed this decision but warned that “every day counts” because 500,000 aviation jobs are at stake.

MAG said prospects for a recovery in demand – down 90% since March – were fading amid a resurgence of coronavirus cases in the UK and Europe, and a full recovery in the number of passengers was not expected until 2023-24.

“Meanwhile, the lack of dedicated support for the aviation sector, coupled with a lack of progress in introducing UK passenger testing to date, has continued to undermine consumer confidence in air travel. for next year, ”the group said.

The company said it had made “heavy use” of the government’s job retention program which subsidized the wages of workers temporarily laid off during the pandemic, as well as cutting all wages by 10% and the freezing of spending plans.

Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player


Airport tests give “false sense of security”

But the leave subsidy is replaced by an employment support program, offering a “much smaller contribution to cover wage costs” for six months from early November, he said.

“The reduction in financial support from the government, combined with a more difficult outlook, means that MAG must now come up with new measures to reduce the size of its workforce in order to secure the long-term future of the company,” the company said. company in a press release.

Managing Director Charlie Cornish said: “By now we would have expected to see a strong and sustained recovery in demand.

“Unfortunately, the resurgence of the virus across Europe and the reintroduction of travel restrictions meant that this did not happen.

“With the uncertainty as to when a vaccine will be widely available, we need to be realistic about when demand is likely to pick up.”

Lawrence Chapple-Gill of the Unite union said: “These job losses are an inevitable consequence of the government’s failure to provide specific support to the aviation sector, the sector which has been hit hardest by the pandemic. of COVID-19. “

Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player


Chief executive of Heathrow: PM must “take control”

Andy Burnham, Mayor of Greater Manchester, called for an industry-specific leave program and said industries like aviation had been “left dry”.

Aviation industry has pushed since the summer for the government to “pull itself together” and institute a testing regime to try to shorten the two-week quarantine period for passengers arriving from countries not on the UK’s safety list.

Launching the government’s task force on coronavirus testing, Transportation Secretary Grant Shapps said: “The current border measures have saved lives.

“Our understanding of the science now means we can step up our efforts to develop options for a test diet and help reinvigorate our world-leading travel industry.”

The DfT said the working group would examine the feasibility of “proposals based on a single test carried out after a period of self-isolation, provided by the private sector and at the expense of the passenger.”

The chief executives of Heathrow Airport, Manchester Airports Group, easyJet and Virgin Atlantic said in a joint statement that it was a “step in the right direction … to relaunch the economy and protect thousands of jobs.

They added: “We support the decision to go for a one-test, private-sector-led, passenger-funded approach that has no impact on the NHS.

“But travelers need a firm commitment that a comprehensive testing regime will be implemented in early November.”

The International Air Transport Association, an industry body, said: “The proposals on the table do not go as far as we had hoped.

“A reduction in the length of the quarantine is the minimum necessary to revive the demand for travel. “


Source link

Menzies Aviation puts 176 jobs at Luton Airport at risk as leave is halted

0

The end of leave also feels like the end of the line for more than 100 people working at Luton Airport as Menzies Aviation seeks to cut its workforce in half.

Travel restrictions mean many airport workers have been put on leave

Menzies Aviation threatened 176 jobs at Luton Airport, about half of its workforce.

The jobs cover roles such as baggage handling, ramp attendants, bus drivers and customer service positions, union Unite said.

Many at-risk people have been put on leave and received notification of proposed layoffs on Wednesday, September 16, meaning their jobs would end along with government support.

The union added that the workforce is mainly based in Luton and Bedfordshire, seeing the local economy hit hard by job losses in the airport and related industries.








The surroundings could be badly affected
(

Picture:

Google Maps)








Unite Regional Officer Jeff Hodge said: “This is not just a hammer blow for the affected workers, but for Luton himself, as the level of job losses at the airport has a terrible effect on the local economy.

“The real bad guys are the government that first promised to provide specific support to the aviation industry in March. The promised and much-needed support did not materialize.

“With the end of the holidays fast approaching, the airlines, which have been the sector most affected by the pandemic, are looking over the edge of the cliff and, as a result, job losses are increasing.”

He added: “The aviation industry is viable once Covid-19 is under control, but the industry cannot bounce back if it continues to lose jobs like these.

“At the end of the day, workers shouldn’t be paying with their labor. ”




Unite, the TUC and all aviation unions are calling on the government to offer targeted support to industries still affected by Covid-19.

This includes the protection of aviation jobs, the suspension of air passenger rights and the relief of commercial tariffs for airports in England, as has been put in place for Scotland and Northern Ireland.


Source link

One third of London City airport jobs threatened by coronavirus

0

More than a third of jobs at London City Airport could be cut due to the coronavirus pandemic, bosses have said.

Airport officials confirmed yesterday (Monday, September 14) that a consultation had started, with 239 positions at risk – some 35 percent of the workforce.

Union bosses warned staff were “feared for their future” at a “traumatic time”.

Like other airports, the Newham-based airport has been hit hard by Covid-19 – 90% of UK flights were grounded during the height of the virus.

In April, just over 700 planes took off from Britain’s ten largest airports in a week, according to global tracking site FlightRadar24.

London City completely halted commercial flights at the end of March, only to resume at the end of June – but with figures still well below those of last year, according to the bosses.

The airport last month put its £ 500million expansion plans on hold due to the cost of the virus.

Staff were put on leave during the pandemic, with the airport increasing wages to 100% until August, when government support was cut.

But the job retention program is due to end entirely from October, and airport general manager Robert Sinclair has said he accepts “with immense regret” that further cuts are needed.

“The aviation industry is in the throes of the biggest recession it has ever seen as a result of the pandemic,” he said.

“We have waited as long as possible for the job cuts, but unfortunately we are not immune from the devastating impact of this virus.”

Mr Sinclair said the cuts should now help London City “bounce back in better shape” from the worst of the crisis.

But Unite, which represents airport staff, said bosses should officially recognize the union if they really want to help employees.

Regional officer Mercedes Sanchez warned workers are “worried and fearful for their future” after the announcement.

“These latest job losses underline why it is absolutely essential that the government come up with a sector-specific support program for aviation, including a modified job retention program, in order to prevent these job losses. unnecessary and protect the communities where aviation workers are located. based, ”she said.


Source link

One third of London City airport jobs threatened by coronavirus

0

More than a third of jobs at London City Airport could be cut due to the coronavirus pandemic, bosses have said.

Airport officials confirmed yesterday (Monday, September 14) that a consultation had started, with 239 positions at risk – some 35 percent of the workforce.

Union bosses warned staff were “feared for their future” at a “traumatic time”.

Like other airports, the Newham-based airport has been hit hard by Covid-19 – 90% of UK flights were grounded during the height of the virus.

In April, just over 700 planes took off from Britain’s ten largest airports in a week, according to global tracking site FlightRadar24.

London City completely halted commercial flights at the end of March, only to resume at the end of June – but with figures still far lower than last year, according to the bosses.

The airport last month put its £ 500million expansion plans on hold due to the cost of the virus.

Staff were put on leave during the pandemic, with the airport increasing wages to 100% until August, when government support was cut.

But the job retention program is due to end entirely from October, and airport general manager Robert Sinclair has said he accepts “with immense regret” that further cuts are needed.

“The aviation industry is in the throes of the biggest recession it has ever seen as a result of the pandemic,” he said.

“We have waited as long as possible for the job cuts, but unfortunately we are not immune from the devastating impact of this virus.”

Mr Sinclair said the cuts should now help London City “bounce back in better shape” from the worst of the crisis.

But Unite, which represents airport staff, said bosses should officially recognize the union if they really want to help employees.

Regional officer Mercedes Sanchez warned workers are “worried and fearful for their future” after the announcement.

“These latest job losses underline why it is absolutely essential that the government come up with a sector-specific support program for aviation, including a modified job retention program, in order to prevent these job losses. unnecessary and protect the communities where aviation workers are located. based, ”she said.


Source link

Thousands of airport jobs on layoff lists

0

Christina Estes / KJZZ

American Airlines jets at Phoenix Sky Harbor Airport on September 4, 2020.

In less than a month, thousands of people could be out of work at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport.

Airlines companies

American Airlines

The federal government’s program to keep passenger airline workers at work expires on September 30. Without further stimulus, American Airlines plans to lay off 140 Phoenix employees on Oct. 1 and temporarily lay off 1,216 others.

In a letter dated July 21 and sent to Phoenix, the company said the leaves should be temporary and “we sincerely hope that number decreases based on factors such as additional voluntary leaves and early departures, or changes. in the demand environment.

At the end of August, American announced that it would be laying off or laying off 19,000 employees in October. In addition, the company said about 23,500 employees have taken buyouts, taken early retirement or taken long-term leave. The Associated Press reported that American started the year with 140,000 employees and expects fewer than 100,000 to be left by October.

sign says closed checkpoint

Christina Estes / KJZZ

Fewer flights mean some security checkpoints are closed, including checkpoint B at Terminal 4 on September 4, 2020.

United Airlines

In a July letter to the Arizona Department of Economic Security, United Airlines said it planned to cut 126 jobs at Sky Harbor on or around October 1. will be temporary

In its letter, the airline said: “While the CARES Act Payroll Support Program has helped protect jobs through September 30, it only covers a portion of our monthly salary costs. normal and none of our significant operating expenses. “

Alaska Airlines

In its notice to the state, Alaska Airlines said it planned to lay off 130 employees on October 1 or 2. Jobs include technicians at Sky Harbor and Chandler-based customer service and reservation agents.

chairs on tables in empty restaurant

Christina Estes / KJZZ

Most restaurants located before security checkpoints are closed, including Wildflower Bread Company at Terminal 4 on September 4, 2020.

Food and drink

HMS Host and SSP America are the companies that oversee catering operations at Sky Harbor. According to its website, HMS Host operates in more than 120 airports around the world and more than 80 travel centers in North America. SSP America claims to operate approximately 2,000 units in 29 countries.

SSP America

In a letter to the city in July, the SSP said it could lay off 429 employees as of September 24. Positions include bartenders, restaurant managers and warehouse workers Many employees have been on leave since March and April.

The SSP said: “The separations are hopefully temporary. The facilities remain open in limited numbers.

“The separations are hopefully temporary. The facilities remain open in limited numbers.”
– SSP America

HMS HMS

In an August letter, HMS Host said if 533 employees are not recalled by October 15, temporary leaves will become permanent layoffs. These jobs include cooks, cashiers, waiters and operations managers.

Flying food group

A private company that provides meals to airlines permanently laid off 96 people when it closed its Phoenix facility on May 20. In an April letter to the state, Flying Food Group cited a significant loss of business for the closure of the facility near 75th Avenue and Buckeye Road. Its website lists facilities in 15 locations across the United States.

→ Get the latest news on COVID-19 in Arizona


Source link

Qantas to cut 2,500 airport jobs | Canberra weather

0

news, business,

Qantas plans to cut up to 2,500 additional employees at Australian airports, adding to the 6,000 employees already leaving the airline. Management told staff on Tuesday they were looking to outsource ground support staff, who take care of baggage, cleaning and other work for Qantas and Jetstar. The move would save Qantas $ 100 million a year as the travel industry remains devastated by the coronavirus pandemic. In June, the group laid off 6,000 workers as part of a three-year plan to cut costs by $ 15 billion. It raised $ 1.36 billion from institutional investors in June and $ 71.7 million from retail investors in August. While Qantas and Jetstar have their own ground staff at major airports, the proposal aims to bring in outside specialists who provide services at other airports. Qantas would outsource ground handling work at 10 airports: Adelaide, Alice Springs, Brisbane, Cairns, Canberra, Melbourne, Darwin, Perth, Sydney and Townsville. About 2,000 jobs would be affected by the move. Jetstar will also outsource ground handling at six airports – Adelaide, Avalon, Brisbane, Cairns, Melbourne and Sydney Domestic – which will impact around 370 jobs. A project to outsource bus services in and around Sydney Airport could also lead to 50 job cuts. Qantas employees will have the opportunity to bid for the work under the corporate bargaining agreement. Qantas Domestic chief executive Andrew David is keen to negotiate with workers, but said the scale of operations for specialist ground handling agents at many airports offers cost advantages. “The numbers are contradictory. We are talking about a 40 percent (cost) difference,” he said. Jetstar personnel will not be able to bid for the work as they have a different industrial relations arrangement. Jetstar Group chief executive Gareth Evans said the outsourcing proposal was not part of the broader changes to Qantas announced in June, with management still working on a plan. “This is an evolving and changing plan, but the steps are necessary,” he said. The media asked Mr David if the group could outsource other roles, such as cabin crew and pilots. However, he said ground handling was a unique area and had providers capable of servicing many airports. Mr David said the group was to lose $ 10 billion this fiscal year and that outsourcing was one way to remedy the situation. “We know that the travel restrictions will eventually be lifted, but the market will be very different,” he said. “Every airline will be doing a lot lighter and more efficient, and we have to be able to compete if we are to survive.” The transport workers union has called on Qantas boss Alan Joyce to step aside from the job cuts, saying: “This is not smart management, it is economic violence.” “Qantas has taken millions of JobKeeper wage subsidies, more than any other company, with the express intention of keeping people in employment,” TWU National Secretary Michael Kaine said in a statement. “But now Alan Joyce wants to destroy thousands of other livelihoods. It is a cruel abuse of public money. The CEO must resign.” Qantas has received $ 515 million in government support, according to a spokesperson. Most of that support was through JobKeeper ($ 267 million), which had largely gone to the laid-off workers. The rest of the funds helped bring Australians back from overseas and provide essential services. Mr David said the appeal for Mr Joyce to leave did not deserve an answer. Shares of the airline rose 2.41% to $ 3.82 at 3:30 p.m.

/images/transform/v1/crop/frm/fdcx/doc7bhbomvg3tyhddiq455.jpg/r3_267_4998_3089_w1200_h678_fmax.jpg


Source link

New Delhi Airport Guidelines: Passengers arriving on international flights must undergo a 7-day quarantine

It has been a while since India started its domestic flight operations and although international flights have not yet resumed, some flights are allowed to land as special cases. For those passengers, Delhi Airport has issued a new set of guidelines, requiring them to undergo a seven-day institutional quarantine at their own expense. This should be followed by 7 days of home quarantine.

A commitment that the passengers accept this obligation is signed by the person or the head of the family and kept by the mission / embassy abroad before the booking is confirmed.

If the passenger plans to stay in Delhi NCR, they will have to undergo the mandatory health check which includes a primary check by the Airport Health Officials (APHO). This includes thermal temperature control by discreetly mounted and highly accurate mass control cameras.

WATCH Zee Business TV live stream online

The guidelines further require passengers to complete self-report health forms. These forms will be collected on arrival. To save time, fill out the forms on board the flight. Passengers will also need to undergo a secondary check at the Delhi government post, which they will be allowed to go to at the approved quarantine location.

State health officials from UP / Punjab / Haryana / Rajasthan and Uttarakhand states are placed in separate triage facilities established in the Meeters and Greeters area and passengers from these states are mandated to report directly to the respective state posts.

Passengers arriving at the first disembarkation airport in India are advised to be quarantined in the city of arrival.

Exemption can only be granted to passengers if they belong to one of the four categories – Pregnant women, Victims of a death in the family, Suffering from a serious illness (Description to be provided) and Parents accompanied by ‘children under 10 years old.


Source link

Save Glasgow Airport jobs campaign launched as union says hundreds face dismissal

0

A campaign to protect jobs at Scottish airports, including Glasgow, has been launched by Unite Scotland.

The union warned that 1,500 workers were at risk of being made redundant by airlines and companies operating at airports in Glasgow, Edinburgh and Aberdeen.

Scottish airport workers are disproportionately affected by expected job losses, the union argued, while some risk seeing their incomes cut by up to 45% by airlines laying off and rehiring staff with wages and worse conditions.

The campaign demands that the leave scheme for the industry be extended beyond the UK government’s end date of October 31, as well as an end to ‘fire and rehire’ proposals for Scottish airport workers.

He also wants any government support, investment or tax relief to be matched with conditions to protect jobs, wages and conditions of employment, in line with the Scottish Government’s Fair Labor Principles.

Unite Scottish Secretary Pat Rafferty said: “The launch of the Save Scotland’s Airports campaign by Unite is vitally important to focus the minds of the Scottish and UK governments on the immense pressure the airline industry is under. civil aviation.

“The scale of the challenge is enormous and that is why we need all politicians to support our campaign demands, which focus on the condition of job protection and the working conditions associated with any business benefiting from a government support.

“We also need strong support from politicians and the public to ensure that any civil aviation company like British Airways and Menzies Aviation stops and cancels the brutal attacks on jobs and labor conditions. ‘work under fire and rehiring practices, which could potentially affect take-home pay, in our opinion, by up to 45%. “

The campaign follows a union warning that the aerospace engineering and civil aviation industries in Scotland “could both be on the verge of terminal decline” without additional support programs from the UK and Scottish governments.

We send out a series of newsletters every day on the latest news, stories and up-to-the-minute information on the coronavirus, as well as the latest food news.

It’s a daily email newsletter of the day’s most important stories – delivered right to your inbox so you can read them at your leisure – when you’re ready.

To sign up, just type your email address in the purple box at the top of this story, hit subscribe, and we’ll do the rest.

Unite Scotland has published the results of a study by the Fraser of Allander Institute (FAI) at the University of Strathclyde, which suggests that around 5,000 Scottish jobs could be at risk due to proposed layoffs in both sectors.

The FAI report found that predicted job losses – at companies such as Rolls Royce, GE Caledonian, Spirit Aerosystems and Wyman Gordon – could also inflict a severe blow of £ 325million on the Scottish economy, with the final loss of 2,530 employees.


Source link

Jobs at Glasgow Airport explode as porter announces cuts

0

More than 300 jobs will disappear at Glasgow Airport after baggage handling company Swissport announced widespread cuts.

Swissport is the country’s largest ground-based provider handling baggage and ticketing at regional airports, including Glasgow Airport, and has been hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic.

It announced yesterday that it was cutting 4,000 jobs – just under half of its 8,500 employees in the UK.

The GMB union has confirmed that 321 jobs are at risk at Glasgow Airport.

GMB Scotland organizer Robert Deavy said: “We warned in March of the need for intervention in our struggling aviation sector, but the political response has been lackluster at best. The constant warnings about the crisis and the ripple effect on airport jobs have been ignored by the UK and Scottish governments.

“We need decisive action and we need it now, as the failure to grasp the scale of the challenge facing aviation will be disastrous, especially in areas such as Renfrewshire where airport jobs and the supply chain are the backbone of the local economy. “

Pat McIlvogue, Unite’s regional industrial manager, added: “We are now seeing the domino effect that is spreading across the entire civil aviation industry, from cabin crew to airport workers and over. by baggage handlers and security personnel.

‘It is imperative that the Scottish and UK governments come up with a tailor-made support package for the industry because if we don’t do this thousands of jobs will be lost and when we come out of lockdown there will be no more workers at major Scottish airports. to help the industry restart.

Learn more about:

A spokesperson for AGS Airports, owner of Glasgow Airport, added: ‘This is a devastating blow to all affected and it highlights the very real challenges facing the aviation industry. in general.

“It is for this reason that we are calling on the UK government to provide specific support to our sector beyond October and the end of the coronavirus job retention program.”

Announcing the job cuts, Jason Holt, CEO of Swissport UK&I, said when planes don’t fly, the company doesn’t make money.

He added, “In May, revenues fell about 75% across our business.

“We are grateful for the help of government support programs, which have allowed us to take the time to think carefully about our position and do all we can to work on solutions that will protect jobs.

“But now we have to adapt to the sad reality that there are simply not enough planes in the air for our business to continue to operate as it did before Covid-19; and there won’t be for a while.

“It is with regret that we are taking steps to reduce the size of Swissport’s workforce. I would like to stress that this is in no way a reflection on the dedication of our teams and the quality of their work. “

Learn more about:

The blow to Swissport jobs comes as 20 NCP car park workers working at Glasgow Airport fear for their jobs.

NCP, which manages the long-term and visitor parking lots at Paisley Airport, is expected to cut half of its 40 employees as early as next month.

The company, which operates parking at many UK airports, said it would not confirm the proposed layoffs, telling The Express it “would not comment on confidential business matters.”

But an employee, who declined to be named, said: “It is the bus drivers who are most worried about their jobs.

“They told us they were reducing cluster managers from two to one, bus drivers from 10 to zero, cleaner from one to zero, and customer service assistants from 23 to 15.”

The worker also said a lack of dialogue between the NCP and staff frustrated workers, many of whom agreed to cut hours and review work patterns until passenger numbers increased at the airport. .


Source link

Heathrow airport jobs crisis means Hounslow has ‘highest number of workers on leave in the country’

0

Hounslow has the largest number of leave workers in the country, the borough chamber of commerce has revealed.

Sally Smith, the organization’s chief operating officer, said the borough led the country alongside Crawley in using the leave scheme, during a Business Taskforce virtual meeting providing support and advice to businesses and local employers.

Questioning a panel, including Hounslow’s head of council Steve Curran, she said the borough expected a “tidal wave” of unemployment when the leave program ends in October.

Cllr Curran said “huge” amounts of work were being done to protect the borough from the worst effects of the coronavirus.

He said he wrote to Prime Minister Boris Johnson urging him to introduce “airlifts” to end the suffocation of the tourism industry.

You can get all the latest MyLondon tracks delivered to your inbox by signing uphere

Hounslow’s cabinet members also agreed on a stimulus package last week on how to handle an economic, social, environmental and community rebound in the borough as the lockdown eases.

But he added: “It’s going to be very difficult for everyone in the weeks and months to come. There’s no point in trying to coat this, all predictions are very dark.

The warnings come as analysis from Wagestream, an income stream provider, showed Hounslow recorded a 308.5 percent increase in applicants for Jobseeker’s Allowances from February to May 2020.



Sound Moves director Martin Corr said he was using the leave program “fully”, and had to make “tough decisions” to fire people.

The breakdown of figures from the Office of National Statistics means that the borough recorded the second largest increase in the country by local authorities, after Stroud in Gloucestershire of 332.8%.

The neighboring boroughs of Slough and Windsor and Maidenhead also reported increases of 295% and 303.6% respectively.

Business Taskforce panelist John Rose of the council’s human resources department urged borough businesses that layoff “should be the last option”, advising employers to think about what to do differently with employees in the future, such as accessing skills improvement programs.

Discussion at the meeting also recognized the benefits of retaining qualified staff to avoid “expensive” recruitment costs and keeping part-time employees.

Freight forwarder Sound Moves is one of the companies with Heathrow as the ‘lion’s share’ of its business, but its niche market of working with clients such as West End productions overseas has suffered ‘very, very badly’ during the pandemic.

Director Martin Corr said he was “making full use” of the leave scheme, and had to make “tough decisions” to fire people.

In January, the employer had 29 full-time employees, who are now down to two, while all the rest have been put on leave or laid off.

“We had to think about it, we knew it wouldn’t be a quick fix. We had to make tough financial decisions to preserve liquidity, ”Corr explained.

“We knew the start of summer was a loss. We won’t see any significant volumes coming back until this time next year.

The boss also ditched all marketing expenses, investing in IT systems and other business developments during the period he said would be a reserve to be made.

He added: ‘It’s pretty bad, I don’t think we’re any different from any other Heathrow-based freight company, there’s nothing to ship, plus we have the issue of limited flights.

“There are problems moving it [freight], there are big penalties if you miss a flight or run into issues with customers we paid for space we don’t use. Social distancing has caused problems, as has self-isolation for 14 days… It just doesn’t work. “

The company will begin rotating staff on leave who have not worked for months, to keep them up to date, and is “committed” to retaining them as they have built professional relationships with clients and are well trained to. work.

And Mr. Corr hopes that by September and October, staff will be able to start making quotes and planning next year’s activities.

He added: “The leave program has definitely saved some very, very difficult decisions. We’re very grateful for that, but on November 1 we’re not just going to turn on the tap again, but we want to keep our staff that we’ve spent a lot of time training.

Have you been affected by the coronavirus in this part of London? If so, send an email to anahita.hosseinpou r @ reachplc.com


Source link