Clark County COVID measures continue downward trend

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Clark County recorded a seventh straight day with fewer than 1,000 new COVID-19 cases on Friday as metrics continued to decline this week.

State data showed the county added 559 new cases and 17 new deaths, bringing Clark County’s total to 483,830 cases and 7,195 deaths.

Four other key metrics fell on Friday: hospitalizations, the 14-day average rate of new cases, the death rate and the 14-day positivity rate.

As of Friday, 859 patients were hospitalized in Clark County with confirmed or suspected COVID-19, down 50 from the previous day. It was the first week with fewer than 1,000 patients since December.

The 14-day average rate of new cases fell by 46, to an average of 662 new cases on Friday. Tuesday was the first time the two-week moving average of daily cases fell below 1,000 in months.

State and county health agencies often redistribute daily data after it is reported to better reflect the date of death or symptom onset, so moving average trend lines frequently differ from daily reports and are considered better indicators of the direction of the epidemic. .

The average is expected to continue falling as daily new cases fall from their omicron peak.

Data guide: the impact of COVID-19 on Nevada

The omicron COVID-19 variant was first detected in a test sample from Nevada on December 14. It peaked in Clark County when – on January 7 – 6,110 cases were added.

The test positivity rate for the most contagious variant peaked at 38.2% before a rapid drop to 22% on Friday, down 0.8 percentage points from the previous day.

Average daily deaths fell by one at the county and state level, bringing the new averages to nine and 13, respectively.

On Thursday, Governor Steve Sisolak canceled the statewide mask mandate in the face of falling case numbers, but experts have warned that removing this level of protection could lead to an increase in new cases.

“What we’ve seen historically is that we’ve removed the mitigations, there’s been an increase in cases that are happening because that layer of protection is no longer in place,” Kevin Dick said. , Washoe County Health District Health Officer. District said Wednesday.

In the aftermath, the Clark County School District, Regional Justice Center and Nevada Gaming Control Board dropped their indoor mask mandates.

Masks will still be required in hospitals and clinics, and under the federal mandate on public transportation, including airports and the Lloyd George U.S. Courthouse.

“There comes a time when you have to weigh the benefits of the mask against the difficulties or disadvantages of wearing a mask, and today is the day we’ve decided that the scales tip,” Sisolak said Thursday. .

Parents at many schools in the Valley rejoiced on Friday morning, with many saying their children were welcome to wear a mask if they wanted to, but parents would prefer it to be the choice of each child.

For many months, state officials followed Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines on mask adherence. For a county to move out of the high-risk category, a state needed a seven-day average of less than 100 cases per 100,000 population and a test positivity rate of less than 10%. On Friday, the CDC showed Clark County had 247.32 cases per 100,000 population and a seven-day test positivity rate of 17.8%.

Nevada added 919 new cases statewide on Friday, bringing the total to 638,528 cases. The closely watched moving average of new cases rose from 1,138 on Thursday to 1,018 on Friday.

Twenty-four more deaths have been recorded, bringing the state’s total to 9,335.

The daily positivity rate fell 0.9 percentage points, to 23.8% statewide.

The health system had numbers close to capacity in January. On Friday, 57 fewer people were hospitalized, bringing the total to 1,044.

More than 56% of Nevada residents age 5 or older were fully vaccinated as of Friday, with the most vaccinated age group being residents in their 50s.

Contact Sabrina Schnur at [email protected] or 702-383-0278. To follow @sabrina_schnur on Twitter.

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